Staples Black Men and Public Spaces Strays Only Slightly

Published: 2021-07-01 06:15:31
essay essay

Category: Racism, Justice, Freedom of Speech

Type of paper: Essay

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Racism has been prevalent in the United States since the first European explorers arrived at our shores. Law reforms since that time have continuously changed almost all of society; however, "public schooling is the context in which desegregation has attained its most salient position as a national issue" (Foner and Garraty). America could reduce the amount of racial discrimination in our public high schools by encouraging everyone to pursue using one main dialect because it would make one less thing that fuels the racism in some people.
Asking people (especially adolescents) to go out of their way to try and make things easier for others that they may not even know might seem like an enormous request at first, but the simplicity of it could show positive results much faster then society has ever thought possible. Racism is generally in reaction to someone's skin color or race so the way someone speaks isn't usually the focus of discussions on the matter. Lets say there was a man named, Bob. Bob was a white man from Missouri and had lost his sight over the years.
One day a new mailman, a black man, cheerfully greeted Bob on his porch, but was instantly shouted at to leave the property. Although Bob was blind at that point, the way in which the mailman spoke had told Bob he was black. Was this fair? Honestly, yes and no. No, it was wrong for Bob to be racist in the first place and shouldn't assume every human that spoke as the mailman did was a person of colors. And yes, it is a pretty fair deduction Bob made due to the fact that the majority of people with that dialect were persons of color.



If high school kids were all able to speak in the same manner as each other then the audible line that separates them would be greatly diminished. With that massive factor out of play, skin color becomes pretty much the sole focus of racism. If people only have one reason why they dislike or hate a group of people it weakens their resolve to continue the fight. In the Jena Six case there was a massive backing of the defendants because they were lead to believe that a great civil injustice had been done. Then the truth that the defendants had been lying came to light and "the fact remains that the Jena Six case climbed to its rickety position as a national symbol of racial injustice largely because a lot of people, some professional activists and many members of the press, wanted it to do so" (Allen).
Benjamin Dowling-Sendor, an authority on school law, is an assistant appellate defender of North Carolina in Durham has wondered if it was "right that the Supreme Court ruled saying prohibition of a flag that the Freedom of Speech Clause of the First Amendment was supposed to cover was justified." (SIRS) Although Dowling-Sendor's issue dealt with a visual symbol the same principal can be applied to audible issues. Would the request of students speaking in a certain way violate their freedom of speech?
I strongly believe that the less diverse a nation is the more stable. The quote, "Unite We Stand, Divided We Fall" seems to apply itself quite well in this situation. We as individuals can remain unique, but unless we find more common ground, starting at young ages such as high school, we are doomed to another civil war.

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